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Floyd County Indiana Magistrate

The Floyd County Magistrate hears cases on assignment by the Floyd County Circuit Court and Superior Courts 1, 2, and 3.

The Magistrate, Julie Fessel Flanigan, was appointed by the Judges of Floyd County Circuit and Superior Courts on September 1, 2014.

Magistrate Flanigan graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 1989 and from the Northeastern University School of Law in 1992. She was admitted to the practice of law by the Delaware Supreme Court in 1992 and the Indiana Supreme Court in 2005. Magistrate Flanigan served as a Staff Attorney and Law Clerk for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit from 1992 – 1994.

Preparing for Court:

  • Courtroom Attire is business casual.
  • Children should not accompany parents in the courtroom unless they are being interviewed by the court in a particular case. There are no facilities to care for children. Other appropriate arrangements must be made.
  • Cell Phones and Recording Devices must be turned off at all times while in the courtroom. No photo or recording devices of any kind are permitted.
  • Parking is available in areas surrounding the City-County Building.
  • Security prohibits weapons of any kind in the courtroom and in the City-County Building.

Frequently Asked Questions 

Q. Can I talk to the Magistrate about a case?

No. The Magistrate must remain independent, impartial and unbiased to both sides to a dispute throughout all phases of the case. The Magistrate may not speak with one side without the other side being present. Neither she, nor her staff, is permitted to give legal advice.

Q. How long do I have to wait before I can be divorced?

You must wait at least 60 days from the date the case is filed. Unless the parties have filed a written agreement, waiver of final hearing and decree of dissolution, One of the parties will need to request a final hearing date to be held.

Q. Do I have to hire an attorney?

Any person may represent himself or herself in a court without a lawyer. However, this does not make the Magistrate or the court staff your lawyer. You must perform just like a lawyer would perform in gathering and presenting evidence and other pertinent information. Neither the Magistrate nor the Magistrate's staff can assist you in preparing or presenting your case. The laws and the rules of evidence remain the same whether you are represented by a lawyer or you represent yourself. The self-help website address is: http://www.in.gov/judiciary/selfservice/forms.html

Q. How do I get a continuance of a court date if I don't have an attorney?

You need to request the continuance in writing more than ten (10) days prior to the court date and provide a copy of that request to the other party in the case. Clearly explain your reasons for the request. Your current address and a phone number should be provided to the Court. You should then contact the Court to see if the continuance has been granted. If the hearing or trial is in less than ten (10) days, the request for a continuance must be notorized or affirmed under the penalties for perjury.

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